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The Story of The Unit Simulacrum and Whole PI

Chapter Three The Unit Simulacrum Page Five    

 

But then, just as I started to see the world in terms of the Sum and the Iam, I realized that if we perceive the world wrong, the equations need to account for that, too. If what we thought was totality was not, if our perception was S´, instead of So , then our perceived world would be off by a factor of (So /S´). We would need a ratio ((Actual Real World) / (our perceived world, S´)) to describe our deviation from proper perception. But since our perception contributes to the whole, even our misperception will contribute to the whole, so the sum of all things will be the sum of our misperceived world plus that Actual Real World. This led to equations for proper perception and improper perception, right and wrong.


          
Since mass spectrometry is a 1.00-based system, and probability is also a 100%, or 1.00-based system. One can pose a question, Q?, and let probability be a 1 plus the ratio we are observing. Whichever ratio provides the crucial decision-making answer to the question is set proportional to 1 + Probability. And probability is proportional to 1, 100 % = 1.00 probability. Therefore, the maximum sum of (1 + Probability) is equal to 2.

S2 is chosen to be the ratio that provides the crucial decision-making answer to the question of comparing S0 and S1. S2 is set proportional to 1 + Probability. And probability is proportional to 1, 100 % = 1.00 probability. Therefore, the maximum sum of (1 + Probability) is equal to 2. This could be interpreted to mean that the sum of all possibility is equal to twice the sum of all probability.